We offer mental health support for Selby and the surrounding areas. Why not give us a call? Our phone line is open from 7 pm – 10 pm, 365 days of the year.

Call us on (01757) 642 399. If you call before our phone lines are open and we cannot answer you will be diverted to an NHS Helpline.

Stockholm syndrome is typically linked to hostage situations and kidnappings. However, it’s not uncommon for people who haven’t been kidnapped or held hostage to suffer from this condition. 

Stockholm syndrome is, in fact, a psychological response to trauma. It occurs when victims of abuse develop a bond with their abuser. The connection tends to develop during the abusive situation, regardless of how long it might last. Those who suffer from this syndrome may start to sympathise with or develop feelings for their abusers or captives.

These feelings are the opposite of the feelings that people tend to associate with abusive or hostage situations. 

In some cases, the victim can feel as if they share common causes or goals with the abuser. They might even begin to dislike anyone who tries to help them escape. 

Stockholm syndrome does not occur in every victim or hostage. It is still unclear as to why some people develop this syndrome, but it is thought to be a survival technique. 

You can learn more about the suggested causes and symptoms of this syndrome by visiting this link.

When Can This Condition Develop?

Stockholm syndrome might begin to develop in some of the following situations:

  • Sports coaching – Occasionally, harsh coaching methods can start to become abusive. The athlete in question may consider the abuse to be for their own good. This way of thinking can develop into a type of Stockholm syndrome. 

  • Abusive relationships – Research has indicated that some people in abusive relationships might begin to develop an emotional attachment to the abuser. Some abuse can last for years. Over this period of time, the victim might develop sympathy for or positive feelings for the abuser. 
  • Sex trafficking – People who are trafficked can rely on those abusing them for food and water. This can cause them to develop some positive feelings towards the abuser. They might even feel the need to resist helping the police with their enquiries.
  • Child abuse – A child might be treated nicely after they have been abused. They can sometimes mistake this treatment as genuine. Treatment such as this can make the child misunderstand the negative side of the relationship. 

Treatment for Stockholm Syndrome 

There is treatment available for this condition. Psychological treatment can help you to deal with any PTSD, depression or anxiety that you might be experiencing. However, this type of treatment tends to help in the short-term. For longer-term treatment, psychotherapy may be used. 

Selby mental health support is available. There is support in your local area and online. If you think you or someone you love might have Stockholm syndrome, please speak to your doctor. 

 

We offer mental health support for Selby and the surrounding areas. Why not give us a call? Our phone line is open from 7 pm – 10 pm, 365 days of the year.

Call us on (01757) 642 399. If you call before our phone lines are open and we cannot answer you will be diverted to an NHS Helpline.

Interested in helping those who are struggling with their mental health? We offer Mental Health First Aid training in Selby. Contact us at info@communitea.org.uk