Eating disorders are not just about food, they are complex mental health conditions that tend to require medical and psychological intervention. 

It’s estimated that 1.25 million people in the UK are suffering from an eating disorder. 

Eating disorders consist of a range of psychological conditions that can cause eating habits to become unhealthy. They may begin with food, body shape or weight obsession. In some cases, eating disorders can cause very serious health issues. Some eating disorders can result in death if they are not treated. 

We offer mental health support for Selby and the surrounding areas. Why not give us a call? Our phone line is open from 7 pm – 10 pm, 365 days of the year.

Call us on (01757) 642 399. If you call before our phone lines are open and we cannot answer you will be diverted to an NHS Helpline.

The Symptoms of Eating Disorders

Some of the symptoms of eating disorders can include severely restricting food, food binges, exercising too much or vomiting. 

What Causes Eating Disorders?

There are different types of eating disorders and they can each be caused by a range of factors. However, there is evidence to suggest that eating disorders are hereditary. 

Personality traits can be another cause of eating disorders. Perfectionism, neuroticism, and impulsiveness can lead to a higher risk of developing an eating disorder. 

There are other potential causes of eating disorders such as the pressure to be thin, including exposure to media that promotes thinness. 

Did you know that a few eating disorders do not exist in some cultures? This is because they have not been exposed to the west’s ideals of thinness. 

In recent years, some experts have suggested that differences in biology and brain structure can also be a factor. 

Common Eating Disorders 

  • Anorexia nervosa – Those who suffer from this eating disorder tend to think they’re overweight, even if they’re very thin. They can monitor their weight constantly, tend to avoid certain foods and even severely restrict their food intake. 
  • Bulimia nervosa – Developing in adolescence to early adulthood, bulimia involves people eating large amounts of food in a short space of time. Some people become so full they’re in pain. They often feel they cannot control what they’re eating or stop eating. They tend to binge on foods they would usually avoid. 
  • Binge eating disorder – Similar to Bulimia, those who suffer from this type of eating disorder tend to binge eat and feel out of control. They do not make themselves vomit or restrict their calories and can be overweight or obese.
  • Pica – Those who suffer from Pica usually eat non-food substances. They crave foods that are not usually eaten as part of their religion or culture, and eating non-food substances isn’t considered to be socially acceptable by their peers. 
  • Rumination disorder – Recently recognised as an eating disorder, this involves sufferers people bringing up the food they’ve already eaten and re-chewing it, spitting it out, or swallowing it voluntarily. 
  • Avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder – Recently recognised as an eating disorder, this involves a lack of interest in food or a disliking for certain textures, colours, smells, temperatures or tastes. This is not the same as picky eating. 

Where To Get Help 

There are many different options available to you if you need help with eating disorders in Carlton or the surrounding areas. 

Some of the options you might want to consider include:

  • Your GP – Your GP can help you with any concerns you have about your eating. They may ask you to keep a diary of your food intake, exercise, and how you’re feeling. This is so they can monitor your behaviour. Your doctor could offer medication and/or refer you to a mental health professional. 
  • Charities– National and local charities can offer support if you’re struggling with food.
  • Community mental health support services – Community mental health teams might be able to offer you help.
  • Student services – If you’re a student in higher education your institution might have a student well-being centre where you can get support. 

 

With help, you could find newer, less harmful ways to deal with the things that are causing you to feel bad. If you’re struggling with food or you’re concerned about someone you love, please ask for support. 

 

We offer mental health support for Selby and the surrounding areas. Why not give us a call? Our phone line is open from 7 pm – 10 pm, 365 days of the year.

Call us on (01757) 642 399. If you call before our phone lines are open and we cannot answer you will be diverted to an NHS Helpline.

Interested in helping those who are struggling with their mental health? We offer Mental Health First Aid training in Selby. Contact us at info@communitea.org.uk